Choosing the Right Carpet Cleaning Company

 

The prices of the Auckland carpet cleaning company may vary according to their qualifications, their experience, and the specific type of carpets you have. You should also be certain that the company is certified by a reputable agency, as you would not want to waste time with an inexperienced one.

Another thing that you should check is their local knowledge in the city. If they do not have any knowledge of the area where the job will be done, then the chances are that it will be done in an inefficient manner. For instance, if the carpets will be cleaned at an office building then you do not need to be concerned about whether or not the carpets will be cleaned in an efficient manner. However, if the carpet is to be cleaned at a luxury hotel or in the airport then you would want to ensure that your company has the local knowledge to do the job.

They also need to have the skills to use the equipment they will be using. Since the area they will be working in may be a busy one, you will need to make sure that they know how to use the equipment properly. You do not want the equipment to be broken, damaged or not used properly.

They should also be able to clean the carpet without making any stains. Stains can be difficult to remove, and they may have to get rid of them manually. This is not something you want to happen while you are out there on a business trip, so you need to make sure the company does have the skills required to do the job properly.

In addition to all of this, you want to make sure that they offer good customer service. You want your business to be as professional as possible and therefore you want your company to be willing to provide you with tips and advice regarding the carpet they will be cleaning.

You should also be able to contact them for additional assistance if you are having problems with your carpets or if you want more detailed information on the cleaning process. You should not have to worry about what questions you might have regarding your carpet; the company should be able to answer all of your questions when you contact them.

Once you have made the final decision to hire the Auckland carpet cleaners you want, be sure that you choose a company that offers the best rates and offers quality services. and guarantees that they will do a good job. This is the only way that you will be happy with your carpet after the work is done. In addition, the company should also be willing to work with you during any delays, and ensure that they provide you with the necessary information you need.

If the company has experience in all aspects of carpets, then it is likely that you will have more confidence in their ability to clean your carpets. This is why it is essential that you choose a company that provides a variety of methods of cleaning your carpets and that they also have some type of guarantee on the work they do.

If you do find that the Auckland carpet cleaners you have selected offer this type of guarantee, it will save you time and money because you do not have to deal with having to pay for the job again. When you have experienced great carpet cleaning results from a company, you will be happy to have the same company work on your carpets.

Remember, once you have found the company that you want to use, you should have confidence in the business you have chosen. There are many companies out there that offer high quality services, but you need to make sure that the company you have selected is reputable.

Do not be hesitant to ask for recommendations from other people who have used the same company, either online or offline. You can also read reviews about the company online, but the important thing is to make sure you are comfortable with the company you are hiring before you make a final choice. Also, before you hire a company you should also ask them about their guarantee, their customer service, their work ethic and their pricing.

A constitution website for all

The Constitutional Advisory Panel will launch a resource-rich website tomorrow at www.ourconstitution.org.nz to encourage all New Zealanders to be part of the Constitution Conversation.

The Panel is seeking submissions from the public about New Zealand’s constitutional arrangements in the first half of 2013.

Panel co-chairs Sir Tipene O’Regan and Emeritus Professor John Burrows say the supporting resources have been created to cater to the needs of all people regardless of their current level of knowledge or understanding about New Zealand’s constitution.

“We realise that many New Zealanders are unaware that New Zealand has a constitution or how integral it is to their daily lives,” says Sir Tipene O’Regan.

“We hope these resources encourage people to feel confident enough to make a submission on these very important issues.”

The resources and the submission guide ask questions on topics like electoral matters, the role of the Bill of Rights Act 1990 and the place of the Treaty of Waitangi in our constitution.

The Panel is also asking New Zealanders to consider what their aspirations are for Aotearoa New Zealand and how they want our country to be run in the future.

Emeritus Professor John Burrows says “A constitution reflects who we are as a country – our unique history and values so the responses to these aspirational questions will influence the final report.”

The resources include a submission guide with a quick submission form, postcards, factsheets, booklets and short videos including an introductory video called “Getting the Constitution Conversation Started”. Resources are also available for community groups to host their own constitution conversations and include a facilitator’s guide, quizzes and suggested activities to stimulate discussions. An online bibliography provides a range of expert opinions on New Zealand’s constitution.

While all the resources are accessible and can be downloaded from the website, printed resources can also be ordered by calling 0508 411 411.

The Panel will be meeting with groups around New Zealand over the next six months to listen to a range of views about New Zealand’s constitution and to encourage people to make submissions. You can find out more about the Panel at www.cap.govt.nz

Submissions on the Constitution Conversation close in July 2013 and can be made online at www.ourconstitution.org.nz, by post or email. The Panel will deliver its final report to Ministers by the end of 2013.

ENDS

Launch Programme

The public launch will be held Tuesday 26 February 2013 at Te Marae, Level 4, Te Papa.

11.30am Preview of the Constitution Conversation resources and a chance to meet the Panel

12.00pm Mihi Whakatau – Welcome by Te Papa

12.15pm Presentation by the Panel – Professor Burrows & Dr Linda Smith

12.45pm An opportunity to share your aspirations for New Zealand with the Panel.

2.00pm Close

Panel members will be available for media interviews at 12.45pm following the presentation. Please contact Damiane Rikihana to organise an interview.

Southlanders are invited to be part of the nationwide Constitution Conversation

Southlanders are encouraged to think about their aspirations for New Zealand and share their views on how they want our country to be run in the future.

Next Tuesday, Invercargill residents have the chance to learn more about the Constitution Conversation from Panel member and former Dunedin mayor Peter Chin. The Invercargill City Council is hosting a public forum called “The Conversation So Far” at the Drawing Room, Civic Theatre on 28 May (7.00pm -8.00pm).

The Panel, which is an independent advisory group to the Government, is seeking submissions on New Zealand’s constitution in the first half of 2013. Specific topics for discussion include the pros and cons of having our constitution written down in a single document, the role of the Treaty of Waitangi in our constitution, and electoral issues such as the length of the Parliamentary term.

Panel member, Peter Chin says that this is an important and exciting opportunity for all New Zealanders.

“These are fundamental matters that affect all our lives so it’s important that people are well informed and take the opportunity to make a submission.”

Panel members, Peter Chin and Hon John Luxton will also be meeting with local community groups and the Invercargill City Councillors earlier in the day.

The Hon John Luxton, who is also the Chair of Dairy NZ, would like to see the farming sector more involved.

“It’s relevant to every individual, and just as important as every vote in a democracy, for people to think about this and express their views,” he said.

“There’s every good reason for rural people to have their say, and to have the rural voice heard. If you keep quiet during the process, then often people think you support the outcome – whatever it is.”

“Rural people are all interested in how we are governed and it’s appropriate they consider what the constitutional issues are.”

The Panel is due to report back to the Government by the end of 2013. Its recommendations will be based on submissions received.

Public submissions are due by 1 July 2013 and can be made online at www.ourconstitution.org.nz by email or post. People can find a wealth of information and meeting resources on the website or by phoning 0508 411 411.

Submission deadline for the Constitution Conversation extended for a month

Due to growing interest in the Constitution Conversation, the Constitutional Advisory Panel has decided to extend the deadline for submissions. People now have until 31st July 2013 to put forward their views on our current constitutional arrangements and how they want our country to be run in the future. The original submission deadline was 1st July.

Co-chair Sir Tipene O’Regan says the extension gives people extra time to consider the issues and additional time for organisations to consult with their membership.

He says it has become increasingly clear to the Panel that more time is needed to develop public awareness about our constitutional arrangements and the impact it has on their daily lives.

“What we’re starting to see around the country is a better understanding of the issues and a broader range of ideas. We’ve received more than 1500 submissions so far. We are keen to give more people and organisations the opportunity to submit their views.”

Co-chair Emeritus Professor John Burrows says the deadline extension means the Panel will not have time to undertake a second round of submissions as originally intended however he says “Each one of the 12 Panel members has heard from a diverse range of groups and individuals. I’m confident that as a group we will accurately reflect the range of views we’ve heard to the Government.”

During the first half of 2013 the Constitutional Advisory Panel has heard and continues to hear from individuals and communities around the country. Panel members have attended more than 100 events.

Key themes emerging from the submissions and discussions so far include our common values, our changing population, the checks and balances on the institutions that hold public power in New Zealand, the role of the Treaty of Waitangi in our constitutional arrangements, the balance between majority and minority rights, the protection of Māori culture and identity, equality, processes of constitutional change and improving the level of knowledge about our constitution.

The public can find out more information about the constitutional issues and terms of reference by going online to www.ourconstitution.org.nz or by ordering printed resources and meeting toolkits via the free phone number 0508-411-411. You can also join the Conversation on Facebook at www.facebook.com/TheConstitutionConversation.

Submissions can be made online at www.ourconstitution.org.nz by email or post before 31st July 2013. The deaf community can make submissions via the Seeflow website at www.seeflow.co.nz.

The Panel is due to report back to the Government with recommendations by December 2013.

[NZ Sign Language link on the deadline extension]

ENDS

About the Constitutional Advisory Panel – Te Ranga Kaupapa Ture

The Panel is an independent advisory group appointed by the Deputy Prime Minister and the Minister of Māori Affairs. Its role is to seek, listen and record the views of New Zealanders on our constitutional arrangements. It will make recommendations to the Government based on the submissions received.

The Panel members are Emeritus Professor John Burrows (Co-chair), Sir Tipene O’Regan (Co-chair), Peter Chin, Deborah Coddington, Hon Sir Michael Cullen, Hon John Luxton, Bernice Mene, Dr Leonie Pihama, Hinurewa Poutu, Professor Linda Tuhiwai Smith, Peter Tennent and Emeritus Professor Dr Ranginui Walker. For profiles on the Panel go to www.cap.govt.nz

Acknowledging a healthy conversation

The Constitutional Advisory Panel thanks all of those who took part in the Constitution Conversation over the past six months.

Co-chair Emeritus Professor John Burrows says, “The response we’ve received to a wide-ranging conversation on our constitution shows New Zealanders care a lot about the future of our country.”

The Panel wants to particularly acknowledge those groups and individuals who hosted more than 100 Constitution Conversations between February and July this year.

“Hosts gave others the opportunity to consider these fundamental issues in their homes, community halls, businesses and marae. We are extremely appreciative of their generous support,” he says.

The topics for consideration included whether or not Aotearoa New Zealand should have a constitution written down in a single document, the role of the Treaty of Waitangi and the Bill of Rights Act in our constitution, Māori representation in local and national government, and a range of electoral matters.

The deadline for written submissions closed on 31 July and the Panel is currently considering these alongside the views expressed at meetings and via online discussions.

The Panel has received 5270 written submissions via the website, by email or by post. Of these, at least 116 are from groups representing the views of their members including two surveys completed by 1092 young people. Some group submissions reflect a consensus among members while others reflect a range of views.

Professor Burrows says the Panel will take in to account all the different ways in which people have contributed to the conversation.

“The analysis of the Constitution Conversation and the submissions is a thoughtful exercise and one step in a much longer conversation about constitutional arrangements.”

The Panel will provide a written report to the Government by the end of year, including any areas of broad consensus where further work is recommended.

While submissions have closed, people who are interested in the constitutional topics can still access resources online at www.ourconstitution.org.nz or order printed resources by calling the free-phone number 0508-411-411.

ENDS.

Constitutional Review Panel report released

Hon Bill English

Deputy Prime Minister

Hon Pita Sharples

Minister of Maori Affairs

Media Statement

Constitutional Review Panel report released

The Government has received the Constitutional Advisory Panel’s final report which recommends that the conversation about New Zealand’s constitutional arrangements should continue, Deputy Prime Minister Bill English and Maori Affairs Minister Pita Sharples say.

The 12-member independent panel spent more than six months having a conversation with New Zealanders about our constitutional arrangements. These included the role of the Treaty of Waitangi, Maori representation in Parliament and local government, the Bill of Rights Act and other matters.

“Alongside meetings and hui, the panel received 5259 written submissions indicating interest in the nation’s constitutional framework, although there is no sense of an urgent or widespread desire for change,” Mr English says. “The Government will now consider the CAP’s report and recommendations, including how the conversation might continue.”

Dr Sharples said he was pleased the panel considered a range of fundamental elements of New Zealand’s constitutional arrangements, including Te Tiriti o Waitangi.

“The Treaty is fundamental to our sense of nationhood, and to who we are as New Zealanders. The question is how we translate that in to increased participation and representation of Maori in our democracy. Those matters will be considered as part of the Government’s response to this report.”

Mr English and Dr Sharples thanked the panel members for their work.

“As the panel itself says, there has been a range of views expressed reflecting the diversity of New Zealand and we appreciate the care that has been taken to ensure New Zealanders’ voices have been heard.”

Copies of the report can be found at www.ourconstitution.org.nz

Towards a healthy democracy

The Constitutional Advisory Panel welcomes the release by Ministers of the Panel’s report on the Constitution Conversation.

Panel co-chair Sir Tipene O’Regan says the Panel heard from a wide range of people and communities in Aotearoa New Zealand. The strongest message the Panel heard is that the Government should actively support a continuing conversation about our country’s constitution. The Panel recommends the Government does this by promoting civics, Treaty of Waitangi and citizenship education in our schools and communities and by supporting people to inform themselves about the options for our constitution.

“A healthy democracy depends on engaged, inquiring and well-informed citizens”, says O’Regan. “We heard that New Zealanders are keen to inform themselves and to talk deliberately and consciously about the unique development of Aotearoa New Zealand as a nation.”

The Panel’s report says the Government needs to ensure people can find out more about the current constitutional arrangements and options for the future.

While many of the Panel’s recommendations on the constitutional topics acknowledge there is a need for more discussion and further development, the Panel has made a recommendation to the Government on the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990.

Co-chair Emeritus Professor Burrows says, “The Act is seen as a fundamental and enduring part of the protections in our constitution. It’s also apparent that people would support a review of the Act to explore whether it can be made more effective.”

The Panel recommends a review of the Act to explore ways to limit Parliament’s ability to pass legislation that is inconsistent with the Bill of Rights Act and to protect the Act from change. The review could also look at adding more rights to the Act, including economic, social and cultural rights, environmental rights and property rights.

On the Treaty of Waitangi, O’Regan says “The Treaty is a founding document of government in New Zealand. Having heard from a wide range of New Zealanders, the Panel’s view is that we need better information about the options for the future role of the Treaty. We can then talk constructively about developing constitutional arrangements that reflect this unique and diverse nation,” says O’Regan.

The Panel recommends continuing the conversation about Māori-Crown relationships with a view to developing options for the Treaty’s future role, and does not recommend at this time including the Treaty of Waitangi in a written constitution or abolishing the Māori seats.

You can view all of the Panel’s recommendations on the constitutional topics and the full report A Report on a Conversation: He Kōtuinga Kōrero mō Te Kaupapa Ture o Aotearoa online at www.ourconstitution.org.nz

Burrows says the report represents the collective view of the Panel members. The Panel hopes the report will form a useful reference for future conversations.

“It’s now up to the Government to decide what they will do with the recommendations. But this isn’t just about government, it’s also up to communities and individuals to inform themselves and to continue the conversation.”

ENDS

About the Constitutional Advisory Panel

The Constitutional Advisory Panel is an independent advisory group appointed by the Deputy Prime Minister Bill English and the Minister of Māori Affairs Dr Pita Sharples in August 2011.

Members of the Panel are Emeritus Professor John Burrows (Co-chair), Sir Tipene O’Regan (Co-chair), Peter Chin, Deborah Coddington, Hon Sir Michael Cullen, Hon John Luxton, Bernice Mene, Dr Leonie Pihama, Hinurewa Poutu, Professor Linda Tuhiwai Smith, Peter Tennent and Dr Ranginui Walker.

The Panel’s role was to seek, listen and record the views of New Zealanders on the constitutional issues described in the Terms of Reference and to report back to the Government by the end of 2013.

The Terms of Reference included a written constitution, the role of the Treaty of Waitangi, Māori representation in Parliament and local government, the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990 and a range of electoral matters.

In February to July 2013, the general public had the opportunity to make written submissions via email or online, join the Constitution Conversation on Facebook and attend meetings and hui on the Terms of Reference. The Panel attended and supported more than 120 meetings and hui, received 5,259 written submissions and had more than 6,400 people join its Facebook page.

The final report and the information resources created for the Constitution Conversation are available at www.ourconstitution.org.nz